Saturday, June 22, 2013

Bankroll Management 101


Note the massive downswing on the bottom (cash game) graph. Lesson: Never bring more than 5-10% of your bankroll to the table, because Murphy (and his law) will stack you... The good news is I had two 2nd place wins last night in our poker league tourneys. Off to Winstar this afternoon for some live cash game action; may the poker gods be kind...

EDIT: Here is the hand where I got stacked:

I'm in the small blind and am dealt KK.
UTG+2 raises to 6.
I reraise to $20.
The Big Blind calls; initial raiser calls, and both will have position on me postflop.
The flop comes 8h 9h Td. Super draw-heavy.
I bet $44, the Big Blind calls, and the preflop raiser folds.
The turn is 5c.
I bet $96 (probably should have checked), the SB shoves for $136. I am pot-committed and have to call.
The river is Jd..
Big Blind shows J10 of hearts and wins with two pair. 

Crushed. What a way to start the weekend.

I need to stop c-betting super-coordinated flops like this, especially out of position. This is the 2nd time recently where I've been stacked with a big pair after someone either flopped a straight or another monster draw. In this case the villain flopped an open-ended straight flush draw, and hit a piece of the flop, so he has 20 remaining outs against my hand: nine hearts, three 7s, two 10s, three Qs, three Js. 

I called him an idiot, but I think he only played it badly preflop. Maybe I'm a super-nit, but I'm not calling a $20 bet preflop with any suited connectors when I'm going to be squeezed by two players post-flop, unless there are a few more people in the hand to sweeten the deal. You're not going to hit a big hand often enough long term to make it a +EV play. Could be wrong.

So let's see how I'm doing at each stage:

Preflop, looking pretty good:


Now I'm already crushed on the flop:


The Turn gives me a slight edge:

And the rest is history. I like his shove on the turn if he's putting me on a high pair with no flush draw, but I'm not crazy about the pre-flop call for 10% of his stack when he's likely to be squeezed. Actually, he's probably better off shoving the flop if he's going to shove at all.

I'm still making errors with bet-sizing in cash games, and I think I will start sizing bets based on what percentage it will be for the big stack, who in this case had $400+. Will juice it more if I am going to be out of position postflop.

My bet on the turn is probably a mistake, since he has position and is either on a draw or a strongly made hand. Hopefully I will learn to proceed with caution on draw-heavy boards like that.


















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